News Item Click to email this article   Click to share on twitter   Click to share on facebook
 
 
Airport's new R1.5bn terminal almost ready
 
From a state-of-the-art baggage sorting system to more than a hundred check-in counters, Cape Town International Airport's R1.5 billion new five-storey central terminal building is expected to be fully operational within five months.
_______________________________________________________________________
 
By Caryn Dolley

From a state-of-the-art baggage sorting system to more than a hundred check-in counters, Cape Town International Airport's R1,5-billion new five-storey central terminal building is expected to be fully operational within five months.

And everything down to the finest details, such as the type of material used in its entrances - Table Mountain sandstone and granite to reflect Cape Town's landmark - has already been selected and designed.

At present, piles of rubble, planks and scaffolding dominate the construction site, and the drone of machinery fills the air.

But, by the end of November, this is expected to be a fully operational terminal where international and domestic check-ins will take place.

The central building, which can fit into the Newlands rugby ground, means in-transit passengers will not need to move from one terminal to another, as is now the case, because the arrivals terminals will be linked to the central building.

Yesterday the construction site, with 1 000 workers, was shown to the media for the first time.

Bharat Bhikha, project leader at Airports Company South Africa, said the top level of the central terminal building would consist of a food court with eight restaurants, and a public viewing deck overlooking the runways.

He said the level below it would be a business class airline lounge for three airlines.

Bhikha said this would also include a central airports operations centre with electronic and information services.

The middle, or third, floor would house a total of four check-in islands consisting of 120 check-in counters, which Bhikha said was more than OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg used.

There would also be 20 self-service check-in machines.

Bhikha said a new automated check-in system meant a passenger's baggage would be placed on a conveyer belt, weighed on it and "sent off".

A baggage sorting system, which cost R103 million, would help keep baggage from different flights separate and include three levels of screening.

The second floor would be a holding area for passengers and able to handle 2 500 people an hour- 1 000 more than can be managed with the present design. The first floor would consist of office space for airlines.

Bhikha said the ground floor, where arriving passengers would be dropped off, would have another food court and retail space with stores, including Woolworths and Dis-chem.

To "try to minimise any kinds of conflict between motorists and pedestrians", he said, two pedestrian subways leading from the parking areas to the central building were being constructed.

Deon Cloete, the airport's general manager, said that by March 8 000 parking bays would be available, which included 4 000 and 2 000 bays in separate parkades, and 2 000 in open areas. Tariffs would depend on where one parked.

caryn.dolley@inl.co.za

This article was originally published on page 3 of Cape Times on May 27, 2009

_______________________________________________________________________
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Terms & Conditions  �  Privacy Policy  �  Security Policy  �  Site Map

© South African Learners Licence Online 2004-2019 All Rights Reserved.